July 19, 2020

East Texas Town Removes Fence At Historically Segregated Cemetery Where Blacks Are Buried In The Back

The Cedars Memorial Gardens Cemetery in Mineola, Texas has removed a fence that until recently separated the burial areas of whites and blacks.

The Cedars Memorial Gardens Cemetery in Mineola, Texas has historically buried whites in the front and everyone else in the back.

The town of Mineola has decided to remove the fence separating the ‘whites only’ burial area, and the ‘colored’ burial area.

Photo: 1830 South Pacific Street Mineola, TX 75773
(Cedars Memorial Gardens was formerly known as Mineola City Cemetary. – cedarsmemorial.org)

NBC News reports, “Municipal crews were digging up a fence between two adjacent but separate historically Black and historically white cemeteries in Mineola, about 75 miles east of Dallas. The removal project began with a Wednesday morning ceremony and is expected to take four days, said David Collett, president of Cedars Memorial Garden, the cemetery historically reserved for the graves of white people.”

Back In 2000 The Mineola City Cemetery Association, Incorporated Say’s “the back part of the cemetery, where blacks are predominantly buried, is run by a separate group called the Mineola Colored Cemetery Association”.

(KLTV NEWS) – “Framed by brick and iron railings, the front entrance of Mineola City Cemetery leads visitors into a lush, landscaped cemetery, predominantly white. This is the rear entrance to the Mineola City Cemetery where black visitors must go to visit their loved ones. A tattered cemetery sign leads these guests into an area with overgrown bushes and weeds…

…”Why is [the fence] still here?” The Mineola City Cemetery Association, Incorporated answered that question for one resident back in 2000.  In the response letter KLTV 7 obtained, it said the back part of the cemetery, where blacks are predominantly buried, is run by a separate group called the Mineola Colored Cemetery Association. In a written response to KLTV 7 Thursday after declining our request for an interview, the association says the cemeteries are “two different entities.”  And that “anyone is welcome to purchase a lot” on their side.”